What camera should I buy?

RockyShore_iphone-0044“I want to take better pictures.  What camera should I buy? ”  Corinne and I get this question a lot.  In most debates over what camera is better, we have little experience and as a result have little to contribute to this discussion.  However, we believe that for new photographers, this is the wrong question.

Let’s be very clear!  Every modern digital camera has the ability to take stunning photographs.  Every camera has its strengths and weaknesses and at a professional level there are some cameras better suited to certain types of photography (e.g., landscape versus wildlife photography).  However, for new photographers, the make of camera matters very little.

So when we are asked, “what camera should I buy?”  we turn the question around and ask “what camera are you using today?”  Frequently, they will hold up their mobile phone, a point-and-shoot camera, or entry-level digital single lens reflex camera (DSLR). We then ask what they think is wrong with their current camera?  Generally, we get a mumbled response that they aren’t getting the photographs they want and they believe the limitation is the camera.

Recently, in response I (Shawn) have been pulling out my mobile phone and showing a series of pictures.  I get the typical response of “aren’t they lovely” and “I can see what you can do with a really good camera”.  With the prey secure in my trap, I point out that all of the photographs they just looked at were taken with my mobile phone.

It’s only after that demonstration that I can address the real question, which is “what should I be doing to take better pictures? ”  Frequently, I ask if they have looked at their camera manual, watched any YouTube videos, or taken any general photography classes?  For most folks, self-learning from a manual or by trial-and-error is difficult.  So, we suggest they take some instruction, either from a professional photographer in the area of photography they like, at a local community college, or from an online class.

 

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Sometimes the problem is not with the camera that they use, but with fundamentals of setting up their shots.  When photographing people, consider locations where the light is not harsh (e.g., under a shady tree) or where the shadows on their features are minimized.   Eliminating or reducing the sky may prevent the subjects from becoming too underexposed in relation to the surroundings.  For landscapes, a little effort to review the composition can make a huge difference.  Moving to a better vantage point or stepping forward to “crop out” the distracting clutter may help.  Compositions that include some interesting foreground components (e.g., wildflowers, beach driftwood, etc.) as well as the attractive vista can be more visually appealing.

In short, education and practice are the path to better photographs.

And after our conversation with the budding photographer, we frequently get the follow-up question, “Is Canon better than Nikon?” <Sigh>

[All images in this post were taken with an iPhone 6 in the Pacific Rim National Park, BC]

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Finding the Right Spot

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We take a lot of photographs in the remote areas of the Washington State and British Columbia.  We travel to a lot of these places on our boat, Salish Lady.  Our boating/photography trips usually involve challenges of selecting a general location, getting there by boat, finding a safe place to anchor, and then launching the dinghy to get to shore.

I think all serious landscape photographers know that getting just the right light is the most important factor in achieving a STUNNING photograph.  However, without some kind of interest in the composition, even the absolute best light and color can’t move a beautiful photograph into the STUNNING category.

Working in the wilderness of Inside Passage makes it doubly hard.  The environment here is beautiful and overwhelming.  Almost every place you stand feels like it should be the “spot”.  But it is also a very complex environment and our eyes do an incredibly good job at distilling the environment for us.  In a photograph, complexity can get in the way of creating the STUNNING image.

Finding the right spot to take the photograph becomes an obsession.  We spend hours and hours trekking across the shore, up hills, and wandering around on small islands.  Don’t get me wrong; we really enjoy this exploration and would do it even if we never had any intention of taking a photograph.  However, finding a spot with just the right “stuff” drives this process.

So how do we decide on the right spot? All the usual rules of composition apply, but the trick we have found that seems to trump everything is simplicity.  We drive to create a simple image, without distractions, but still something to capture the viewers’ emotions.  We like to allow the simplicity combined with the colors tell the story.  When we are really successful, the image tells a story and hints at the broader beauty of the area.  A goal we strive for but rarely achieve.

So when faced with an overwhelmingly beautiful vista, look for the simple composition.  Have faith that from a simple image the story will be clear.

Back on the Water

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We are back on our boat Salish Lady for another year of cruising in the Pacific Northwest (and BC southwest).  This year is a little different because I (Shawn) have semi-retired from some of my business concerns and hope to be fully retired by the end of the year.  Although I still have some business responsibilities, this is the first time in many years where I can set my own agenda every day.

Spending time on our boat has helped with the transition because there are always maintenance tasks to be completed.  She can be a demanding lady at times.  Boat projects are a nice distraction because they are discrete tasks that can be planned and completed in a few days.  It is always nice to progress through a “To Do” list relatively quickly.

I was very fatigued because the last few years have been extremely stressful. The downtime I have had in the last month to rest and recover has been rejuvenating.

I am now starting to turn my focus to writing and photography, two hobbies that have had the potential to be much more than just hobbies.  In previous years, we had a pretty good stream of articles and photographs that were published in boating magazines, but that activity waned as I had more demands on my time and energy due to my businesses.

Currently, Corinne and I are working on two different book projects.  As I start to put more energy into them, my days have become increasingly busy and it won’t be long before I will whine about never having enough time.  We also plan to put together more of our images with the “she saw/he saw” theme that we initiated last winter.  We post many of these on our Z Frontier Photography Facebook page  (https://www.facebook.com/zfrontierphoto).

All-in-all it has been a nice transition to a new focus for my time and energy and I am enjoying the chance to work on some creative endeavors.

Hoping for just the right amount of clouds

Sand Dune Sunset

Landscape photography is most interesting at sunrise and sunset.  Photographers talk about the golden hour, the 30 to 40 minutes before the sun dawns over the horizon and again just as the sun is setting and for the next 30 to 40 minutes.  When the sun is low, there is wonderful light.  At this time of day, the red rocks of the southwest seem to glow from within.  Landscapes seem to come alive.  However, the rocks and trees and bodies of water are usually only a part of the picture.  The sky is also an important component of image.  After a beautiful sunny day, you would expect that photographers would find ideal conditions for some early evening photography.   However, clear skies do not necessarily produce the most pleasing images.  Instead, photographers hope for some clouds, but not so many that they cloak the horizon.  A clear horizon and a scattered set of clouds can be extremely beneficial.   The clouds provide a surface that can reflect the first or last rays of light.  Under the right conditions, the sky can seem to light on fire.  The color in the sky can bring beautiful drama to photographs.

After a mostly clear day spent walking the dunes at Coral Pink Sand Dunes State Park in Utah, we set up for some sunset pictures of the dunes.  In the late afternoon, a fairly thick layer of clouds developed.  We set up to photograph some dunes in the east, hoping there would be a break in the clouds and the last rays of sunlight would generate a beautiful glow to the hills of sand.   The time of the sunset came and we didn’t get the effect that we were expected, but turning around and surveying the hills to the west, we discovered that the clouds had lifted a little from the horizon and we were going to be treated to a little evening color.

The picture above was captured with a Canon 5D Mark III, with a Canon EF 24 – 105 lens at a focal length of 40 mm with a 2 sec exposure and the aperture set at f/16.

Getting Motivated

This winter, we have been making a more concerted effort to get out for some photography day-trips.  We realized that we needed a project to focus our efforts.  To that end, we assigned ourselves a project to create a photo book about hiking the Spring Mountains, with particular focus on Red Rock Canyon National Recreation Area, which is a 30 minute drive from Las Vegas.  I don’t know if the book will ever come to fruition, but it has been a good motivator to get us out hiking.

Finding the motivation to get out for some photography on the weekends can be a little difficult.  We have always enjoyed hiking on the weekends.  It helps clear our brains and the fresh air and exercise feel great.  However, the extra challenge of planning some photography and getting out early for sunrise (or staying out late for sunset) can be a bit of a psychological and logistical hurdle.  By the time we finish a five day work week at our “paying” jobs, we often find it difficult to scrape up the energy and brain-power to concentrate on our creative hobby.  Weekends can also mean accomplishing a few of the chores that don’t get done during the week.  A big part of the challenge is thinking up new places to hike that have attractive photo opportunities.  Selecting a long-term project, like the Red Rock Book, creates focus for our hiking and photography, so it takes a lot less mental energy to get us out there with the cameras.

We recently changed the knapsacks that we use to carry our photography gear.  We switched to Mindshift Rotational-180 Horizon backpacks.  Most of the gear that we need for a day trip is all packed in the bags.  We can literally grab our packs and a couple of bottles of water and go.  Of course it still requires that we charge the batteries and make sure that we have memory cards ready and in the cameras.   However, we make a habit of doing that after we return from each day of photography.

Having a specific set of photographic goals and photo kit that is ready to grab-and-go helps us to overcoming the psychological and logistical hurdles.  We have found that we have a better attitude about getting out to capture great images.

 

Shiny Pebble Photography

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I hate to say it, but I have become a “shiny pebble” photographer.  It is a curse!  My 2016 resolution is to stamp out “shiny pebbles” in my photography!  So what is a “shiny pebble” photographer?  It is a photographer that spends the time, effort and planning to be in the right spot at the right time to get the spectacular picture but gets so mesmerized by the  other possibilities that he/she ends up taking a bunch of mediocre pictures and most likely misses the “wow” image that we all try to obtain!

A few weeks ago, Corinne and I took a hike from our neighborhood toward some distant hills to the southwest.  We realized that the best time to take photographs of the area would be at sunrise.  However, it would be a hike of an hour or more to the best location.  Getting to the place that might offer the best composition during a pre-dawn hike would be too challenging if we didn’t have it scoped out first.  So, the initial hike was to find the “right” spot.   We started the hike in the late morning and we checked out several viewpoints before we settled on the one that seemed to be the best.  I took a few photographs with my smartphone so that I would have a good sense of the composition that I wanted to set up when we came out with our camera gear.  Corinne had used the “Map My Hike” application on her smartphone so that we could find the selected viewpoint again.

On December 30, we got up at 4:30 am and headed out in the dark for the previously discovered out location.  We arrived before dawn and had several minutes to set up our cameras for the planned composition.  Next, we had to have patience.  It was cold.  Corinne paced around to keep the blood circulating.  As the sun began to rise, a nice rosy glow slowly developed on the hills.  I had to keep to my original plan and not get distracted.  “Remain focused”, I told myself.  “Stick to the plan and don’t get distracted by shiny pebbles”.   That morning, I got the shot I planned.  It was nice, not excellent, but I was happy that I had the discipline to not stray because any other photos that morning would not have let me capture my best potential shot for the morning.

So, my 2016 pledge is to do the planning and make the effort to get to the right place at the right time and focus on creating the composition that I have in my mind.    I believe that the result will be more images with the “wow” factor!

Valley of Fire State Park Excursion

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The first thing you need to know about camping at Valley of Fire State Park during the Thanksgiving holiday is that it is busy.  The campsites in the park fill up quickly.  We arrived on Wednesday around 10:00 am.  The park staff at the west entrance gate told us that there were only a few primitive camping spots left at the Arch Rock campground.  However, we boldly decided to take a chance and drive through the Atlatl campground where there were some sites with electrical and water hookups.  To our surprise, we found an open campsite with hookups.  The campsite had a pretty significant grade; regardless, it became our home for the weekend.

Our goal for the weekend was to capture some pictures for our photographic portfolio.  We had a loose plan to capture some landscapes photos in the morning and at sunset and maybe try for some moon, light painting and star photos after dark.

We were traveling with our elderly dog Prince, so our photography had to accommodate his schedule.  There was a time when Prince would have been up for long hikes into the desert and been happy to have been up from sunrise to sunset.  Now, at 14 years old, he finds our hiking schedule too aggressive.  So, getting up early in the morning for a dog walk before we head out with cameras makes it difficult to plan any photo sessions at dawn.  After Prince’s walk, we can leave him in our RV for his morning nap and we set off for our planned hikes.  We returned each day at noon and spent time with Prince for another dog walk and sitting out outside at our campsite.  Then after dinner, we could get out for another photography session.

On our first evening at Valley of Fire, we went a short distance from our campsite to Arch Rock.  We had done a little research and reviewed the location in the early afternoon.  The full moon was going to rise shortly after dark on an angle that might allow us to shoot it using the Arch as a frame.   Although we had nailed the planning, our equipment was not quite up to the task of getting the photo we wanted.   The moon was full and bright, but our flashlights were not sufficient for lighting up the foreground of The Arch.  We did capture a couple of nice pictures with the moon backlighting The Arch.  After of couple of hours of working the scene, we were both cold and it was time to retreat to the trailer for a hot drink.

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On Thanksgiving morning, we hiked the Prospect Trail.  This is a wonderful trail that can be followed to a junction with the White Dome Trail.  We planned a shorter 2 mile walk up into the pass where there are a series of interesting rock formations.  We had planned to spend about an hour among the rocks, but in the end we spent the entire morning working around the rocks.  The light was pretty good for mid-morning and finding great compositions was challenging and fun.

Friday morning we had planned to do two hikes, one on the Duck Rock Trail and one on the White Dome Trail to shoot the slot canyon once the sun was a little higher in the sky.   It was a short hike out to Duck Rock.  Unfortunately, at the time we arrived, the angle of the sun and thick cloud layer made shooting very difficult.  We tried to capture a decent image from a bunch of different angles. We walked to the far side of Duck Rock (it doesn’t look like a duck from that side) and we even hiked up an adjacent hill but nothing we did resulted in a composition that we liked.

Before we returned back to the car, Corinne suggested we continue down the wash to see if there might be something of interest a little further along the trail.  We scored!  Being open to walking a little farther can be the biggest factor in finding wonderful landscape subjects.  Less than a quarter mile down the trail, we ran into a series of natural tanks.  These are depressions that hold water.  Tanks are rare and important to the desert habit.  They provide water for local wildlife.  From the rock ledges above the tanks, the entire valley opened up providing a very interesting vista. 

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The geology in the area is very colorful.  We spent hours moving around the rocks, trying different compositions.  We spent so much time at Duck Rock Trail that we never made it over to White Dome Trail.  It was getting on to early afternoon and it was time to return and spend time with Prince.

Friday night found us out doing some light painting of the rocks near the campground.  Shawn gets a kick out of creating unexpected scenes on the rocks.  Corinne was more interested in getting a photo of star trails.  Unfortunately, right after we decided to switch from light painting to star photos, a cold wind started to blow.  Even with heavy cameras and excellent tripods the camera shake was very obvious.  Furthermore, the temperature dropped from being merely cold to uncomfortable!  It was time to retreat to the RV for a hot drink.

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On Saturday, we returned home to Las Vegas.  It was a short but fun trip.  Now it is time to see if we can make the most of the photographs we captured.